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Kidneys

 

Kidneys

The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs found on the left and right sides of the body in vertebrates. They filter the blood in order to make urine, to release and retain water, and to remove waste (The excretory system). They also control the ion concentrations and acid-base balance of the blood. Each kidney feeds urine into the bladder by means of a tube known as the ureter. They are roughly 11 centimetres (4.3 in) in length.

The kidneys regulate the balance of ions known as electrolytes in the blood, along with maintaining acid base homeostasis. They also move waste products out of the blood and into the urine, such as nitrogen-containing urea and ammonium. Kidneys also regulate fluid balance and blood pressure. They are also responsible for the reabsorption of water, glucose, and amino acids. The kidneys also produce hormones including calcitriol and erythropoietin. The kidneys also make an important enzyme, renin, which affects blood pressure through negative feedback.

Located at the rear of the abdominal cavity in the retroperitoneal space, the kidneys receive blood from the paired renal arteries, and drain into the paired renal veins.

Renal physiology is the study of kidney function, while nephrology is the medical specialty concerned with kidney diseases. Diseases of the kidney are diverse, but individuals with kidney disease frequently display characteristic clinical features. Common clinical conditions involving the kidney include the nephritic and nephrotic syndromes, renal cysts, acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, urinary tract infection, kidney stones, and urinary tract obstruction.[1] Various cancers of the kidney exist. The most common adult renal cancer is renal cell carcinoma. Cancers, cysts, and some other renal conditions can be managed with removal of the kidney. This is known as nephrectomy. When renal function, measured by the glomerular filtration rate, is persistently poor, dialysis and kidney transplantation may be treatment options. Although they are not normally harmful, kidney stones can be extremely painful.

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